9681 Gladiolus Dr. #211, Fort Myers, FL 33908

239-337-2667  |  info@AdvantageAnywhere.com

© 2019 by Genesis Global Technologies - Authors of Advantage Anywhere

Terms & Conditions - Privacy Policy - Anti-Spam

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Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996

If you store or touch healthcare information in Advantage Anywhere, you are responsible for securing that data.  Be sure and request the HIPAA Compliant version.

Please download the Advantage Anywhere HIPAA Compliance Statement

Privacy Policy 

Advantage Anywhere is a sales and marketing tool to help our clients stay connected with their clients, customers and associates.  We care about protecting your personal information and provide a platform that encrypts and decrypts user page requests as well as the pages that are returned by the Web server. Upon request, we provide a HIPAA compliant version of the Advantage Anywhere platform. 

We collect data that includes user information (name, email address, company name, physical/mailing address, phone number(s), geographic information, etc.), publicly available information, browser information, device information, information you consent or provide as well as information provided by 3rd party publicly available information.

Anti-spam Policy

SPAM as defined by the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 (Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing Act of 2003) is a law that sets the rules for commercial email (bulk and individual emails), establishes requirements and guidelines for commercial messages, gives recipients the right to have you stop emailing them, and spells out tough penalties for violations.

According to the FTC, the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003, all email must follow and comply with the law as outlined below:

Each separate email in violation of the CAN-SPAM Act is subject to penalties of up to $42,530, so non-compliance can be costly. But following the law isn’t complicated. Here’s a rundown of CAN-SPAM’s main requirements:

  1. Don’t use false or misleading header information. Your “From,” “To,” “Reply-To,” and routing information – including the originating domain name and email address – must be accurate and identify the person or business who initiated the message.

  2. Don’t use deceptive subject lines. The subject line must accurately reflect the content of the message.

  3. Identify the message as an ad. The law gives you a lot of leeway in how to do this, but you must disclose clearly and conspicuously that your message is an advertisement.

  4. Tell recipients where you’re located. Your message must include your valid physical postal address. This can be your current street address, a post office box you’ve registered with the U.S. Postal Service, or a private mailbox you’ve registered with a commercial mail receiving agency established under Postal Service regulations.

  5. Tell recipients how to opt out of receiving future email from you. Your message must include a clear and conspicuous explanation of how the recipient can opt out of getting email from you in the future. Craft the notice in a way that’s easy for an ordinary person to recognize, read, and understand. Creative use of type size, color, and location can improve clarity. Give a return email address or another easy Internet-based way to allow people to communicate their choice to you. You may create a menu to allow a recipient to opt out of certain types of messages, but you must include the option to stop all commercial messages from you. Make sure your spam filter doesn’t block these opt-out requests.

  6. Honor opt-out requests promptly. Any opt-out mechanism you offer must be able to process opt-out requests for at least 30 days after you send your message. You must honor a recipient’s opt-out request within 10 business days. You can’t charge a fee, require the recipient to give you any personally identifying information beyond an email address, or make the recipient take any step other than sending a reply email or visiting a single page on an Internet website as a condition for honoring an opt-out request. Once people have told you they don’t want to receive more messages from you, you can’t sell or transfer their email addresses, even in the form of a mailing list. The only exception is that you may transfer the addresses to a company you’ve hired to help you comply with the CAN-SPAM Act.

  7. Monitor what others are doing on your behalf. The law makes clear that even if you hire another company to handle your email marketing, you can’t contract away your legal responsibility to comply with the law. Both the company whose product is promoted in the message and the company that actually sends the message may be held legally responsible.

  (Excerpt from the FTC Anti-spam compliance guide found here)

To avoid being labeled as a 'Spammer'

Send messages in a responsible manner and get your emails delivered.  Email deliverability is vital to the success of all businesses and organizations.  Send emails to contacts wishing to receive your content and the type of content they will be receiving and give them a choice.

Unsubscribe

Every email sent or deployed from Advantage Anywhere provides an unsubscribe link. This link can be found in the footer of all emails sent and gives the recipient the ability to click the unsubscribe or manage email settings link and permanently unsubscribe from receiving further emails.  This notification is also logged in the history of that contact record with date/time of the unsubscribe for verification purposes.

Identification

All email deployed out of Advantage Anywhere are pre-filled with your contact information including your email address, physical address and the sent-to address.

Reporting Abuse

If you feel an Advantage Anywhere client is sending unwanted and unsolicited emails, please report this by forwarding it to Abuse@AdvantageAnywhere.com.  This email will be reviewed and we will investigate its content, sender and take the appropriate next steps to thwart further abuse.